Press Release: Racism in Journalism Portland Mercury

November 1st, Portland Mercury recently published a factually weak article by Doug Brown, accusing Commissioner Loretta Smith of illegally “Raking in cash for a city council run.” They accuse Smith of improperly fundraising for her future political campaign. The article was not properly researched and is another example of careless racist journalism in Portland Oregon. This attack on Loretta Smith is another way white-owned and operated Portland newspapers can play fast and loose with the truth whenever a black leader is involved or has a position of power.

The Mercury doesn’t appear committed to accuracy in journalism if it concerns black people in Portland, even respected black leaders like Loretta Smith. For a Newspaper that appears to support The Portland Resistance, shouldn’t the Mercury’s young white reporters also check their facts? The City Charter amended their rules to make it legal to fundraise while also working another position and if they had done their homework, the Mercury would know that. Or maybe they knew already but just didn’t care.

This form of racial bias in journalism proves the point many critics of white liberal media have; that wealthy and influential white media do not genuinely care about African Americans in general, black Portlanders specifically and black leaders in particular. The Mercury also doesn’t seem to care about the role of black leadership or in how they are unjustly smeared in print.

This article by the Mercury is a humiliating demonstration regarding exactly how black leaders in Portland are held to a different standard. Would The Mercury have written such an accusatory and suggestive article about a white candidate running for office? It is unlikely.

Loretta Smith has shared information with me regarding the charter rule that was amended the first of January 2017 that allows her the leeway to do what she’s done.

I challenge the Portland Mercury to admit their factual error and their racism in how they threw Loretta Smith under the bus.

I challenge The Portland Mercury to APOLOGIZE to Commissioner Smith and all the black residents of Portland for their careless article. I challenge the Mercury to stop hiring only white staff writers and to practice what they preach about truly recognizing and promoting racial diversity and most importantly racial equity and equality for the black residents of Portland.

2017 needs to be the year Portland media makes some big changes if they expect to b taken seriously. This process begins when they stop excluding people of color from leadership roles or in political debates as happened last year. This process begins by not attacking black leaders as easy targets and smearing their names in print simply because they can.

Other national newspapers and social justice organizations are watching Portland. There are other individuals and entities in this nation who are watching “The Whitest City” in the country, including some well-known journalists and even The Southern Poverty Law Center.

The Portland Mercury, Willamette Week, and the Oregonian newspapers must learn to adapt to a changing political climate due to racial discrimination that continues to infect this country, and to the greater expectations that accompany that shift. These newspapers must stop promoting shoddy yellow journalism and the blatant racism that goes with that.

They need to hire more black staff writers, and journalists and focus on issues and black concerns. They need to stop merely talking the talk of diversity and inclusion. They need to start walking the walk and that means action, and doing.

 

Mulnomah County Charter
https://multco.us/file/55743/download

 

Portland Mercury Article on Loretta Smith
http://www.portlandmercury.com/news/2017/11/01/19436141/loretta-smith-is-raking-in-cash-for-a-city-council-run

 

Facebook Post to Fred Stewart from Loretta Smith

Loretta Smith Fred, I want to first say I am following the Multnomah County Charter rules.

Jules Bailey did the same thing last year when he ran for Mayor and the Portland Mercury did not do write an inflated story on his legality. I just want to be treated fairly by you and the press.

Secondly, I do not want a compliment from you every time you see me about my beauty or attractiveness for the rest of my life. That is not necessary.

You have have an important voice that is needed and should be heard on housing. Insulting my integrity and repeating misinformation will only distract you and others from your real gift and expertise on housing issues that must be shared during this crisis.

Many folks are not aware that there are new rules that former Commissioners did not have. Below are the new rules effective January 1, 2017.
All the papers have this too. They chose to give their story a different slant and focus. Sir, I believe you owe me an apology.

Peace and blessings to you.

4.20. Terms Of Office; Successive Terms; Running For Office In Midterm.

(3) Effective January 1, 2017, Commissioners of Multnomah County may run for the Office of Chair of Multnomah County mid-term without resigning their current elected office. No elected official of Multnomah County may run for another elective office in midterm without resigning first. Filing for another office in midterm shall be the same as a resignation, effective as of date of filing. “Midterm” does not include the final year of an elected official’s term. Filing for another office in the last year of an elective term shall not constitute a resignation.
[Amendment (ballot measure 26-76) adopted by people Nov. 3, 1998; amendment (ballot measure 26-78) adopted by people May 16, 2006; amendment (ballot measure 26-182) adopted by people Nov. 8, 2016]

 

 

 

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Fred Stewart for a Portland Youth Bureau. Vote Fred Instead!

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Friends during this election season we have discussed a lot of issues and they are all important. One of the most important is what can we do to improve the lives and opportunities for all of our children. Especially children that are in families that are struggling to just keep a roof over their heads. Portland must always invest in our youth through the up and the down cycles we face in Portland. ‪#‎PortlandYouthBureau‬

City Commissioner Candidate Fred Stewart with Dr. Don Baham

 

 

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Host, Dr. Don Baham, interviews guest about how and why he chose to become a political public servant in pursuit of his desire to be of service to his fellow citizens. Fred appears to personify dedication to progressive ideas and action.

 

 

Portland Police Visioning Committee, Part 1

 

 

 

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I will lead the City of Portland in developing the type of Police Bureau that will reflect the values of the people of Portland.  We are one of the safest cities in the United States, and we can do better. ~ Fred Stewart

Fifty years ago, our grandparents came together to decide how the Portland Police Bureau would change and develop over time. They epitomized civic engagement through their involvement with numerous agencies in our city and their governance. The decisions that they made affect us today because they shaped the attitudes and policies of the Portland Police Bureau and its response to changes in technology, society, and Portland’s cultural landscape. These decisions have helped us make real improvements to our police force, but some of the policies and practices that they developed half a century ago are outdated and simply do not work.

Today we stand in a similar place where our grandparents stood some fifty years ago. We are trying to design a police force of the future and are working to improve the decision-making process that will impact the lives and liberty of our children and our grandchildren. The choice we have before us is between a humane, socially-engaged, and responsive police force that respects citizens as it protects and serves them, and a militarized, high-tech, “Robocop” police force that might protect us, but also threatens some of the liberties we all enjoy.

What will the police force of the 2060s look like in Portland? That is the question we must answer. Our answers to this difficult question and the changes we make as a result will have a serious impact on the lives of our descendants. We owe it to them, to the people who will inherit Portland, and, of course, to ourselves, to make these decisions carefully and in an inclusive, democratic manner. These decisions must live up to the principles of self-government and liberty that were handed down by our Founding Fathers and defended by our grandparents–principles that will preserve a finer way of life for our grandchildren, and for their children as well.

That is why I propose a Police Visioning Committee made up of community leaders, business leaders, and retired police officers to help us answer the important questions that face the Police Bureau. This Police Visioning Committee will brainstorm ideas and methods that will help ensure a police force that respects and protects citizens and upholds the people’s civil rights, civil liberties, and the rule of law.

Some of the questions that must be answered by this committee include:

  • How can we make certain the Police Bureau is diverse and inclusive of allracial and ethnic groups in the city?
  • How can the Police Bureau become more sensitive, responsive, and aware ofthe needs of our diverse citizenry, which includes the large number of homeless and mentally ill people currently living in Portland?
  • How can police officers be held accountable for their actions, especially anytype of wrongdoing, without infringing on their rights, including their right to union representation?
  • Should police officers be armed in all situations, or are there times when anunarmed police presence is more desirable?
  • How can we protect our officers from the violence and reduce the effectsof post-traumatic stress on police officers?
  • How can we effectively deal with people experiencing mental health crises without treating the mentally ill as a threat or the enemy, while ensuring that law enforcement officers are protected from violence and “suicide by cop” attacks?
  • How can we successfully recruit new officers and deal with the policemanpower shortage without recruiting police officers from other cities? How can we avoid getting the “bad apples” that a particular department may wish to transfer out in order to get rid of them?

Deciding how our Police Bureau needs to change and evolve will not be an easy process because there are so many important dynamics to consider. Some police methods are time-honored, highly effective, and should not change, while other police methods and training procedures should be examined with new eyes, in hopes of updating them.

It was not easy, to develop and sustain good leadership for the Portland Police Bureau when it was established in the 1870s, and it was not easy in the 1930s when advances in technology and changes in society required that Portland leaders once again reform the Bureau’s practices. It was not easy when changes were instituted in the tumultuous 1960s, in response to all the political and social unrest and civil rights reforms that transformed our country. The changes that resulted from that formative era shape the Portland Police Bureau of today.   

We cannot shirk our responsibility to overhaul the Police Bureau simply because it is not easy. Instead, we must make these decisions together with all citizens who hold a stake in the future of Portland.  This is what the Police Visioning Committee needs to address, for the betterment of all Portland citizens, here and in the future.

I urge all Portlanders who genuinely care about our city to support and participate in this process. As we make the decisions and lay the groundwork to provide our descendants with a Police Bureau that is humane, diverse, effective, and committed to a peaceful, prosperous and democratic Portland, we need community involvement and engagement to make that actually happen.

Portland needs a Police Bureau that will uphold the ideals of American policing: to protect and serve, while creating and maintaining positive relationships with community members of all races, all classes and from all parts of the city. My goal is that twenty five years from today, all Portlanders will consider the Portland Police Bureau the best police force the city has ever had, and celebrate its engaged, committed, and friendly officers who genuinely care for all Portland’s people.

Report Card for Fred Stewart

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By Fred’s Campaign Team

SUBJECT: Economic Experience
GRADE: A
COMMENTS:
 Fred has a substantial amount of experience in the world of real estate and banking. He has presided over 1000 real estate transactions and 2000 mortgage transactions over his 25-year career as a Realtor. He also has a strong background in banking, having worked for five years with one of Australia’s largest investment banks, Macquarie Ltd. With a strong understanding of how the housing market works and a focus on North and Northeast Portland, Fred can speak firsthand to the changes occurring in Portland’s economy. Fred’s economic understanding of Portland would be highly invaluable at City Hall.

 

SUBJECT: Community Involvement
GRADE: A
COMMENTS:
 Fred has taken an active role in the community he calls home. After reviving the King Neighborhood Association, he was elected its President in 1990, an office in which he faithfully served for nine years. Under his leadership, the King Neighborhood Association went from a dead organization to one of the most active Neighborhood Associations in all of Portland, with a board noted for its diversity of backgrounds. As a Realtor who sold homes near his own, Fred worked not just to make money selling properties, but to build, shape, and preserve a community that he and his neighbors could be proud to call home. This degree of community involvement reflects a civic spirit currently lacking in City Hall.

 

SUBJECT: Commitment to Social Justice
GRADE: A
COMMENTS:
 Fred has long been an advocate for social justice in Portland. Of particular interest to Fred has been the issue of law enforcement and how the police interact with citizens. By serving on the Portland Police Bureau’s Police Internal Investigations Auditing Committee (PIIAC), he worked to hold the police accountable to the people and helped ensure fair, impartial analysis for all parties involved in investigations. At the same time, he served on the Police Bureau’s Budget Advisory Committee to ensure that Portlanders’ tax dollars were being spent well. Yet Fred’s passion for social justice is not limited to police issues. He has long been an advocate for LGBT rights in Portland, going back to his hard work on the No on 9 Campaign in 1992. Finally, Fred has fought in his capacity as a Realtor to keep Portlanders in their homes. During the Great Recession of 2008-10, Fred coordinated with dozens of people who were at risk for displacement and homelessness, and, at no personal profit, worked out arrangements to keep them in their neighborhood homes in North and Northeast Portland. All of this points to Fred’s willingness to take leadership roles in fighting for Portland’s most vulnerable people.

 

SUBJECT: Experience with Everyday Portlanders
GRADE: A
COMMENTS:
 Fred turned a seedy strip club in North Portland into a neighborhood bar called Shanny’s Tavern. It was a good place, and patrons enjoyed its homey environment and friendly owner/bartender. The beer was good, too—Fred was an early adopter of Portland’s renowned microbrews. As its owner, he employed up to ten people at a time, and paid a wage that was well above the market standard. Even after he left the bar business, he maintained his focus on building relationships as a Realtor and as a community activist, and counts people from a great variety of cultures, neighborhoods, political stances, and socioeconomic levels as his friends and confidantes. As a candidate, Fred has still has been known for his openness to talking about the issues and listening to people’s hopes and concerns. Chat him up next time you see him out and about, or give him a call—he’ll talk to anyone, anytime.

 

SUBJECT: Appreciation for the Nitty-Gritty
GRADE: A
COMMENTS:
 Fred knows what it takes to be a City Commissioner. His service on the Metro Future Vision Commission is a testament to his ability to apply personal experience as a Portlander and professional expertise as a Realtor and banker to making the City of Portland a better place. On the Commission, Fred dove wholeheartedly into the details of urban planning, from traffic engineering to population dynamics, and by listening, researching, and asking questions, he helped the Commission. Fred has a lot of good and bold ideas, like instituting land banking in Portland, or mandating micro-generation of power on newly-constructed buildings, but he recognizes that any good idea is rooted in many layers of research and analysis. Unlike many on the current City Council, Fred only proposes ideas that he knows to be airtight, and refuses to offer “feel good” solutions that accomplish only superficial change.